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FENCE FACTS: DIGGING, CHEWING, JUMPING, AND MOTIVATION

 

Introduction to Dog Fence Facts
Barrier Versus Shock Collar Fences
Dog Size and Jumping
Digging and Chewing
Dog Temperament and Motivation

Dog Training
Number of Dogs and Changing Dog Residents
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Dog Size and Jumping

Something not true of most animals is true of dogs: They come in a wide range of shapes, sizes, and jumping abilities. While this adds to our enjoyment, it poses certain problems for dog fences. Specifically, one needs to custom plan the fence (or custom modify it) to suit the dog it serves. Small dogs may not need tall fences, while big dogs do. Beyond that, one needs to gauge the dog's jumping ability. If the dog jumps well enough to go sailing over the existing fence, then the fence won't work. It needs to be extended upward or replaced with a taller fence.

Digging and Chewing

Similarly, there's great variation in the eagerness of dogs to dig. Of course, if a person expects to be present at all times when the dog is out, then digging is not an issue. Irrespective of the precise circumstances, if digging is an issue one needs to take appropriate countermeasures--by training Fido not to dig under fences, or by establishing a digging barrier on the ground. For more on such alternatives see Fence Options.

Chewing is less of a problem, because most dog fences resist chewing. The main exception is plastic (polypropylene) fencing, which is easy for a chewing dog to penetrate. So if you think your dog might be inclined to chew the fence, that kind of fencing should be avoided. Good alternatives in such a case would be a wooden fence, a chain link fence, or one of our welded wire fences. 

Temperament and Motivation

 Some dogs (especially older ones) are so passive and peaceful that one could hardly imagine their challenging any fence. Others are so frisky and energetic (imagine a young border collie for example) that challenging any fence is in their blood. Hence, temperament has a lot to say about the kind of fence one needs. Likewise, some dogs are highly motivated to seek freedom beyond the fence while others aren't, and some are merely motivated to engage in certain kinds of behavior (like digging) that are apt to cause fence problems. Therefore, in order to avoid spending too much or money or too little, it is important to take your dog's temperament and motivation into account in deciding what sort of fence you need.

 

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